Rehab Nurse

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 Rehabilitation nurses are specifically trained by experience, continuing education, or graduate education to provide nursing services to patients disabled by strokes or other chronic diseases, with the goals of restoring and maintaining health, function, independence, and quality of life for the patient and family, and the cost-effective use of resources.  They often serve as “case managers,” and are a critical part of the rehabilitation team.  Indeed, the typical rehab "patient" will have more contact time with the nursing staff than any other type of rehab provider.

     Training:  

     A certified rehabilitation registered nurse (CRRN) is a registered nurse (RN, requires 4-year or 2-year academic training program) with at least 2 years of experience in rehabilitation nursing who has been examined and certified by the Rehabilitation Nursing Certification Board. 

      A nurse practitioner is an RN who has met advanced educational and clinical practice requirements. A nurse practitioner conducts physical examinations, takes medical histories, orders and interprets laboratory tests and x-rays, diagnoses and treats common illnesses; and, in 43 States, prescribes medications.

 

 

Copyright by Jack Winters.
For problems or questions regarding this web contact Jack Winters.
Last updated: January 16, 2001.